Dedicated to providing the latest
HIPAA compliance news

Texas Expands HIPAA Privacy Laws to Bolster EHR Security

Share this article on:

Governor of Texas, Rick Perry, has signed a new law to give Texas residents even greater protection than required by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and has increased penalties for healthcare organizations that fail to implement the appropriate security measures to protect the health data of patients.

Under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), covered entities have a number of responsibilities including reporting data breaches to the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). Data breaches are reportable to the OCR, either in an end of year report or after an investigation, depending on the number of individuals affected.

HIPAA places a number of restrictions on how ePHI is used and stored, and all covered entities are required to conduct a full risk analysis to assess systems for security vulnerabilities to allow risk to be managed. It also lays down the procedures that must be followed after a data breach, such as notifying potential victims. Covered organizations are also required to conduct an investigation into how a breach occurred as well as a risk of harm analysis.

One of the main aims of HIPAA has been to improve the standard of data security and protect the privacy of patients. HIPAA and HITECH can be seen as minimum standards that must be followed, and states are allowed to increase data security rules, provided that all HIPAA requirements are met.

Texas has now exercised the right to tighten state privacy laws to ensure electronic Protected Health Information is kept private and confidential.

Greater Protection for Texas Residents

The new Texas law follows HITECH, although it makes a number of amendments to further restrict the use of ePHI. The penalties have been increased for wrongful disclosure, breach notifications have been updated and healthcare organizations must provide more training to staff. A new requirement is that data privacy and security training must now be provided to employees every two years. Training courses must be documented and all attendees must sign to confirm that they have received training. A 60-day time restriction has also now applies for providing new employees with training.

According to the new law, “an individual’s PHI may not be disclosed without the patient’s authorization, except for purposes of treatment, payment, healthcare operations, insurance purposes, and as otherwise authorized by state or federal law”

Harsher Penalties for Wrongful Disclosure of ePHI

Failure to comply with the new legislation will result in increased financial penalties and possibly criminal penalties – the theft of ePHI is now considered a felony – being applied for the wrongful disclosure of ePHI. The state is also able to revoke both professional and institutional licenses. Financial penalties have been increased to a maximum of $250,000 for intentional disclosure of ePHI for financial gain, $25,000 for intentional or knowing violation and $5,000 for each individual negligent violation, although the maximum penalty for repeat offenders is $1.5 million and enforced withdrawal from Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and other state funded healthcare initiatives is also a possibility.

When assessing violations, the seriousness of the data breach will be considered along with significant risk of harm, past history of the organization, certification, the efforts made to mitigate any damage caused and the amount necessary to deter the organization from allowing further violations to occur. Failure to issue breach notifications to affected individuals will also be penalized at a rate of $100 per day, per individual, up to a maximum fine of $250,000.

HIPAA regulations require employers to provide training on data Privacy and Security Rules, although this is only required within a short time frame of the commencement of employment and after a material change in Privacy and security policies. Under the new Texas law there is a requirement for ongoing training to be provided to staff and this must also be tailored to the employee’s position within the company. Rules have also changed on breach notifications to include all HIPAA covered entities including business associates, as well as non HIPAA-covered entities that wrongfully disclose ePHI.

Author: HIPAA Journal

HIPAA Journal provides the most comprehensive coverage of HIPAA news anywhere online, in addition to independent advice about HIPAA compliance and the best practices to adopt to avoid data breaches, HIPAA violations and regulatory fines.

Share This Post On

Free Weekly Newsletter

Email address exclusively used for newsletter

Confidentiality guaranteed