House Committee Leaders Request Answers from Google and Ascension on Project Nightingale Partnership

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Leaders of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce are seeking answers from Google and Ascension on Project Nightingale. The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights has also confirmed that an investigation has been launched to determine if HIPAA Rules have been followed.

The collaboration between Google and Ascension was revealed to the public last week. The Wall Street Journal reported that Ascension was transferring millions of patient health records to Google as part of an initiative called Project Nightingale.

A whistleblower at Google had contacted the WSJ to raise concerns about patient privacy. A variety of internal documents were shared with reporters on the extent of the partnership and the number of Google employees who had access to Ascension patients’ data. Under the partnership, the records of approximately 50 million patients will be provided to Google, 10 million of which have already been transferred.

According to the WSJ report, 150 Google employees are involved with the project and have access to patient data. The whistleblower stated that those individuals are able to access and download sensitive patient information and that patients had not been informed about the transfer of their data in advance. Understandably, the partnership has raised concerns about patient privacy.

Both Google and Ascension released statements about the partnership after the WSJ story was published, confirming that Google was acting as a business associate of Ascension, had signed a business associate agreement, and that it was in full compliance with HIPAA regulations. Under the terms of the BAA, which has not been made public, Google is permitted access to patient data in order to perform services on behalf of Ascension for the purpose of treatment, payment, and healthcare operations.

Google will be analyzing patient data and using its artificial intelligence and machine learning systems to develop tools to assist with the development of patient treatment plans. Google will also be helping Ascension modernize its infrastructure, electronic health record system, and improve collaboration and communication. Google has confirmed in a blog post that it is only permitted to use patient data for purposes outlined in the BAA and has stated that it will not be combining patient data with any consumer data it holds and that patient data will not be used for advertising purposes.

Democratic leaders of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce wrote to Google and Ascension on November 18, 2019 requesting further information on the partnership. The inquiry is being led by House Energy Committee Chairman, Frank Pallone Jr. (D-New Jersey). The letters have also been signed by Chairwoman of the Subcommittee on Health, Anna Eshoo (D-California), Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Commerce Chair, Jan Schakowsky (D-Illinois), and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair, Diana DeGette (D-Colorado).

In the letters, the Committee leaders have requested information on the “disturbing initiative” known as Project Nightingale.

“While we appreciate your efforts to provide the public with further information about Project Nightingale, this initiative raises serious privacy concerns. For example, longstanding questions related to Google’s commitment to protecting the privacy of its own users’ data raise serious concerns about whether Google can be a good steward of patients’ protected health information.”

Ascension’s decision not to inform patients prior to the transfer of protected health information has also raised privacy concerns, as has the number of Google employees given access to the data. Further, employees of Google’s parent company Alphabet also have access to Ascension data.

The Committee leaders have requested a briefing by no later than December 6, 2019 about the types of data being used, including the data being fed into its artificial intelligence tools, and the extent to which Google and Alphabet employees have access to the data. The Committee leaders also want to know what steps have been taken to protect patient information and the extent to which patients have been informed.

The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights has also confirmed that it has launched an investigation into the partnership. Its investigation is primarily focused on how data is being transferred, the protections put in place to safeguard the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of protected health information, and whether HIPAA Rules are being followed. Google has stated it will be cooperating fully with the OCR investigation.

Author: HIPAA Journal

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