Roger Severino Gives Update on OCR HIPAA Enforcement Priorities

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Roger Severino, Director of the HHS’ Office for Civil Rights, has given an update on OCR’s HIPAA enforcement priorities at the OCR/NIST 11th Annual HIPAA Conference in Washington D.C.

Severino confirmed that one of OCR’s top policy initiatives is still enforcing the rights of patients under the HIPAA Privacy Rule and ensuring they are given timely access to their health information at a reasonable cost.

Under HIPAA, patients have the right to view and check their medical records and obtain a copy of their health data, yet there are still healthcare organizations that are making this difficult. OCR has already agreed to settle one case this year with a HIPAA-covered entity that failed to provide a patient with a copy of her health information. OCR had to intervene before those records were provided to the patient. The entity in question, Bayfront Health St Petersburg, paid a financial penalty of $85,000 to resolve the HIPAA violation.

More financial penalties will be issued to covered entities that fail to comply with this important provision of HIPAA. Severino confirmed that Bayfront Health’s financial penalty was the first in a series of penalties for covered entities that are not providing patients with access to their health data within 30 days of the request being received.

OCR has issued guidance to help covered entities comply with this aspect of HIPAA, but now the time has come “for serious enforcement,” explained Severino.

Severino also explained that patients must be allowed to have their health data sent to health apps. The requests should only be denied if the app poses a security risk to the covered entity. Severino confirmed a covered entity is not liable for what happens to PHI after a disclosure to a health app at the patient’s request.

In many cases, patients are not being denied access to their medical records and requests for copies of medical records are being honored, but patients are being charged excessive amounts. In 2016, OCR issued guidance on the amounts that healthcare organizations can charge for providing copies of medical records and further clarification was also issued on the fee structures that can be adopted. Financial penalties for overcharging for copies of medical records can be expected.

The crackdown on patient access issues is part of the HHS Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care initiative and fits in with the Trump Administration’s drive to improve transparency of healthcare costs and the reduction of the cost of healthcare in the United States.

A prop is always useful for getting a point across. In this case Severino used a medical boot that he purchased to aid recovery from a torn Achilles tendon. Severino said he was advised by his doctor to purchase the boot and paid his doctor $430 for the treatment aid. He explained that he later looked online and found the exact same boot for sale on Amazon for $70, saying “This boot represents what’s wrong with price transparency.”

OCR is looking at how HIPAA can be updated to address this problem, such as requiring healthcare providers and health plans to provide information about the expected out-of-pocket costs for medical services or equipment before those items or services are provided to patients.

Contractors provide quotes for work in advance and banks provide customers with information on the costs of mortgages before providing the funds, but that doesn’t always happen in healthcare. That is something that needs to change.

Severino also touched on the issue of cybersecurity. Phishing and ransomware attacks cause a high percentage of healthcare data breaches and in many cases the attacks can be prevented by practicing good cybersecurity hygiene.

Ransomware is often installed through the exploitation of vulnerabilities in Remote Desktop Protocol. The failure to address those RDP vulnerabilities has led to several major healthcare ransomware attacks and data breaches.

Phishing attacks have been a major cause of healthcare data breaches for several years. It is not possible to prevent all attacks, but by complying with HIPAA, risk can be significantly reduced. HIPAA calls for covered entities to provide employees with training to help them identify and avoid phishing threats. Severino explained that training is critical, as is conducting phishing simulation exercises to find out how susceptible employees are to phishing.

Other cybersecurity failures that could prevent data breaches include the lack of multi-factor authentication, poor access controls, and the failure to promptly terminate access to systems when employees leave the company.

2019 may have only seen four OCR financial penalties issued to date to resolve HIPAA violations but the year is far from over. Further penalties will be announced this year, including a $2.1 million civil monetary penalty.

Severino did not confirm the reason for the penalty or provide any details, other than saying a final determination has been reached and the penalty will be announced by the department soon.

Author: HIPAA Journal

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